Life as a Depressed Parent

The New York Times parenting blog posts an outstanding video conversation about parenting and depression. Though the conversation is from a parent's perspective, the perspectives on depression in general are ones anyone can relate to who's experienced depression. Talking about depression brings it out of the closet and on to the dining room table where it belongs. Everyone needs to feel supported in talking about their internal struggles, and having the chance to lessen the load of "crushing despair" that so commonly prevents people with depression from getting help.



Heather Armstrong of Dooce.com leads this candid talk about depression, having shared her experience with post partum depression and her eventual psychiatric hospitalization. She noted the resistance and lack of understanding that was common among her own family and friends.
It's all in your mind, No one ever said life is fair. Will you stop that constant whining? What makes you think anyone cares? You have it so good, why aren't you happy? Stop feeling sorry for yourself!

Danny Evans of DadGoneMad.com offers his observations on depression from the guy's perspective.
The hardest thing about being depressed is that you can't see it. There's no lab report, no x-ray, or cat scan that definitively says, yes that person is depressed. You have to take that person's word for it.
And finally, from the comments section at the blog there is this heartfelt endorsement:
As the child of a depressed parent, I urge other depressed parents to get help. Depression is a serious problem and it affects not only the sufferer, but everyone around them. And I applaud anyone who speaks candidly about it in the hopes that it will encourage others to seek the help they so desperately need.
This embed link is a bit buggy, as it is at the New York Times site, but if you continue to click play in the screen or the control bar play button it should start.


My name is Dave Ebaugh and I've been helping individuals struggling with depression and mood disorders in Portland, Oregon, for over 20 years. Give me a call or fill out the contact form below. I can answer your questions or set up a free consultation. I can set the appointment for my office, or in your home. Let me know how I can help you.